Spring Framework 4.3: AsyncRestTemplate interceptors

After a short break I would like to get back with very interesting topic. Not often you have ability to describe one of the upcoming features of widely used libraries like Spring. Last year I’ve co-authored really simple feature that adds to the Spring’s AsyncRestTemplates a very needed extension point: interceptors. So I would like to take here the liberty to describe them more deeply.

This topic might not be so much useful for most variety of use cases of the AsyncRestTemplate, unless you are developing yourself frameworks or libraries and  you are looking for seamless integration. The contract of the interceptor fallows as much as possible it’s RestTemplate’s counterpart.

public interface AsyncClientHttpRequestInterceptor {

    ListenableFuture intercept(HttpRequest request, byte[] body, AsyncClientHttpRequestExecution execution) throws IOException;
}

The major difference is that instead of returning the response object the interceptor has to work on a ListenableFuture – a observable promise that eventually will return a HTTP response.

The minimal implementation to intercept the response through the interceptor requires to add callback of the ListenableFuture. Example:

public class AsyncRequestInterceptor implements AsyncClientHttpRequestInterceptor {

   @Override
   public ListenableFuture<ClientHttpResponse> intercept(HttpRequest request, byte[] body,
         AsyncClientHttpRequestExecution execution) throws IOException {

      ListenableFuture<ClientHttpResponse> future = execution.executeAsync(request, body);
      future.addCallback(
            resp -> {
               // do something on success
            },
            ex -> {
               // process error
            });
      return future;
   }
}

Why does introducing the interceptors is important or anyhow useful? If we would take a look of the existing functionality of RestTemplate that is provided through Spring Cloud Netflix, Spring Cloud Commons, Spring Cloud Security or Spring Cloud Sleuth we can list a bunch of interesting applications:

  • Ribbon client load balancing – this is in fact done through ClientHttpRequestFactory, though ClientHttpRequestInterceptor would be sufficient to achieve the same result.
  • Spring Cloud Security – uses them to add load balancing to the OAuth2RestTemplate.
  • Spring Cloud Sleuth – uses them to add tracing header to the outgoing request.

Some other example use cases:

  • Request/response logging
  • Retrying the requests with configurable back off strategy
  • Altering the request url address

You may expect this functionality available with the release of Spring Framework 4.3 and Spring Boot 1.4. Since open source projects have some inertia in development, any integration build on top of it for instance in Spring Cloud probably won’t be available until the 1.2 release.

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